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Turner Drake & Partners Ltd.
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# Thursday, April 1, 2021

Expropriation is the forceable taking of property by an acquiring authority for a public project, such as a road, transmission line, pipeline etc. In the vast majority of cases, only a small portion of a property is taken, and sometimes only a partial interest is required.  Pipelines, for example, only require a sub-surface easement interest, allowing the owner to continue using the surface for anything that doesn’t interfere with the operation and maintenance of the pipeline itself.  Transmission lines are happy to share, requiring only an easement interest for the towers and the overhead lines.  Regardless of whether the interest is full (fee simple) or partial (easement), the acquiring authority pays compensation for the value of the interest taken, the boundaries of which are defined by a survey plan and a legal description, properly recorded at the Land Registry.

In some instances, however, an acquiring authority may exert control beyond the boundaries of what it has legally acquired.  In Nova Scotia, new highways are usually designated as controlled access highways under the Public Highways Act, imposing potential new restrictions on building setbacks.  A permit from the Minister is required for the construction of buildings and structures within 60 metres (197 ft.) of the limit of a designated controlled access highway or within 100 metres (328 ft.) of its centre line.  That is probably far more restrictive than the local By-Laws require, potentially sterilizing a fair chunk of land alongside the new highway unless Ministerial approval is granted.  In rural areas it probably doesn’t matter, but in urban areas it might, especially if there is a potential for development.  The Public Highways Act does allow compensation for so-called injurious affection resulting from a controlled access highway designation … but not for new highways.  So, any compensation in respect of new setbacks alongside new highways must presumably be claimed via the Expropriation Act, even though the restrictions are authorised under a different act.

Pipeline easements come with similar strings attached.  Oil and gas pipelines are regulated under the National Energy Board Act (which strictly speaking grants orders for rights of entry rather than expropriations).  The Act imposes an automatic 30 metre (98 ft.) Prescribed Area – or safety zone – on either side of the pipeline, within which so-called ground disturbances and construction activities are restricted. Some activities are totally prohibited and others require the pipeline company’s permission.  So, whilst the pipeline company only acquires the easement within which its pipeline sits, it casts a 30 metre shadow on either side.  Compensation for restrictions within the 30 metre safety zone is often challenged but has been awarded and upheld by the Federal Court in valid circumstances.  Again, in rural areas it might have little impact, but in urban areas it most likely will, especially if it interferes with development plans.


Lee Weatherby is the Vice President of our Counselling Division. If you'd like more information about our counselling services, including advice on expropriation matters, feel free to contact Lee at (902) 429-1811 or lweatherby@turnerdrake.com

Thursday, April 1, 2021 10:37:40 AM (Atlantic Standard Time, UTC-04:00)  #    -
Atlantic Canada | Counselling | New Brunswick | Newfoundland & Labrador | Nova Scotia | Prince Edward Island | Turner Drake
# Tuesday, June 30, 2020

In truth, very few people get the chance to suffer the trauma of an expropriation.  You have to be in the wrong place at the right time. But if and when your opportunity does come, your best hope is to emerge financially “whole”, albeit a little battle scarred, confident that the lawmakers have your back through their expropriation legislation.

Expropriation legislation has its roots in the Dickensian days of the English railway boom of the 19th century, a time of rapid industrialization that needed legislative “devices” to hurry things along. Reforms followed until eventually the individual was adequately protected against the state. In Canada, legislative reform came along in much more modern times, but by the 1970’s most provinces had a pretty decent code of expropriation compensation in place.  And Nova Scotia was among the best of the best.  Its 1973 Expropriation Act fully embraced the commendable philosophy that because expropriated owners were being deprived of their property against their will, they should not be treated as typical litigants. Instead they were entitled to be satisfied – at the authority’s expense – that they were indeed being treated fairly. The playing field was level: all was good.

Alas, things have changed since then. Numerous subtle and not-so-subtle changes have been introduced over the past 25 years that have tilted the playing field.  And always in the same direction. Perhaps the biggest changes, in the Nova Scotia Expropriation Act at least, have been with regard to the expropriating authority’s legal obligation to reimburse a claimant’s fees. The original safety net was contained, in plain and simple language, in section 35 of the original Nova Scotia Expropriation Act.  It entitled an expropriated land owner to be reimbursed for “the cost of one appraisal and the legal and other costs reasonably incurred…in asserting a claim for compensation”. Checks and balances protected the public purse from frivolous abuse, but the basic intent was that, win, lose or draw, an owner – rich or poor - was entitled to be heard at the authority’s expense. 

The first change came in 1996. Section 35 was abruptly repealed and in its place stood a re-enacted section 52. Things became considerably more dicey for the property owner with respect to the reimbursement of costs, which were now only assured if the owner proceeded to a hearing and won outright.  The owner was now in much the same position, for cost purposes, as a typical litigant who chooses to engage in combat.  Of course, there is nothing preventing an amicable settlement without resorting to a hearing – and the vast majority of expropriations are settled that way – but the safety net of section 35 was removed.

2019 saw more changes when the Nova Scotia government introduced a Tariff of Costs to control the amount of appraisal, legal and other experts’ costs that an expropriating authority must legally reimburse. Henceforth the amounts that combative property owners can recover are prescribed by law.  With respect to appraisal fees, the allowable amounts depend on the complexity of the case (measured against a rather loosely defined benchmark called “ordinary difficulty”).  In some cases the Tariff will be sufficient. In other cases it will fall short.  The same with the reimbursement of legal fees.  Claimants may very well have to reach into their own pockets to pursue their case from now on, as would a typical litigant. If you think that sounds a tad unfair, you are right.  After all, no one chooses to be expropriated. And from my experience it is always more time consuming, and therefore more costly, to represent a claimant than it is to represent an expropriating authority. For property owners, this is a once-in-a-lifetime event.  The rules have to be explained; facts sorted from fiction; expectations managed. Expropriating authorities, on the other hand, can draw on their in-house resources and often have a wealth of experience.  The conversations are different.

And it’s not just the issue of cost reimbursement that has been tilted. Another amendment in 1996 denied compensation for loss of access along provincial highways when alternative access is being provided by new service or access roads. An odd, and as far as we know unique, twist to the Nova Scotia compensation code. More recently, a 2019 amendment introduced a new definition of Disturbance to the Nova Scotia Expropriation Act, a particular head of claim that arises when a claimant has to relocate.  The old words had withstood the test of time, undefined but “undisturbed” for a generation. In Nova Scotia it is now very narrowly – and again, as far as we know, uniquely - defined and will inevitably defeat claims that have previously been upheld.  Indeed that’s the whole point.

Changes to the Expropriation Act in Nova Scotia have usually been introduced as knee jerk reactions following adverse decisions by the courts, introduced as helpful “clarifications” to help them get it right next time. Challenging an expropriation and pursuing a claim through the courts has never been for the faint-hearted.  But these days you might need a war chest with no guarantee that you will emerge financially “whole”. 

Lee Weatherby is the Vice President of our Counselling Division. If you'd like more information about our counselling services, feel free to contact Lee at (902) 429-1811 or lweatherby@turnerdrake.com

Tuesday, June 30, 2020 10:05:02 AM (Atlantic Daylight Time, UTC-03:00)  #    -
Atlantic Canada | Counselling | New Brunswick | Newfoundland & Labrador | Nova Scotia | Prince Edward Island | Turner Drake
# Wednesday, September 18, 2019

Photo Credit: iStock Photo AntonioGuillem

It comes like a bolt out of the blue; the municipality wants to purchase your property so that they can widen the highway. Often times they intend to seize just part of your property: that front yard you so carefully nurtured to provide a fragile barrier between your home and the busy street is destined to become another traffic lane. Many owners have received this type of letter, more will receive similar letters in the future (if not from the municipality then the province, federal government or any organisation with expropriation powers such as a water authority, power utility, Crown Corporation). Sometimes the purpose of the exercise may not be clear, other than the fact that your property, or part of it, is required for the public good. During our early days in business in the 1970s some provinces, such as Nova Scotia, did not always inform owners that they had taken title to their property… the unfortunate owner only discovered such was the case when they enquired why they were no longer getting a property tax bill! Often times, municipalities such as the City of Halifax, did not advise the owner that they required the property, or part of it, content to leave it to the appraisal firm to break the news when they arrived on site to conduct their inspection. (We fired the City of Halifax as a client after arriving on site to find the property owner had not been informed about the expropriation; his wife was dying of cancer in the bedroom). Legally this is still the case in many provinces in Atlantic Canada; the acquiring authority does not have to inform you that you no longer own your property for several months after they have filed the expropriation document (Nova Scotia 90 days, Prince Edward Island 60 days). Thankfully in practice, that at least has changed, but the unfortunate reality is that property owners rarely have legal grounds to prevent the authority from purchasing their property. In other countries, property owners have to be notified that their property is to be expropriated and have the right to object that the acquisition is not really required for the road widening, or other scheme that is its raison d’etre, or that the scheme itself is not required to serve the public good. But this avenue is rarely available in Canada, or indeed in North America. (In this Region, proposed expropriations under the Federal and New Brunswick Expropriation Acts are the exception that prove the rule. Each require the acquiring authority to notify the property owner before they expropriate and provide a public enquiry to hear objections. However the Federal Act is really window dressing, the public hearing a mechanism to “vent”; the New Brunswick Act however does require the Expropriation Advisory Officer to issue a decision as to the necessity for the expropriation and whether the scheme is consistent with the public interest. If your property is located in Nova Scotia, Newfoundland or Prince Edward Island you have no say in the matter at all!. Even if subsequent events disprove the “valid public use” test, owners have no right to recover their property (the ill-fated Mirabel Airport in Quebec is an example… the original owners, or their descendants, were eventually offered 300 hectares of the 38,800 hectares originally expropriated, but only after a long, bitter and very public fight). So what do you do when you receive “the letter”, particularly if it does not mention “expropriation” and is instead a civilised attempt to negotiate compensation before the municipality seizes your property by force?

 

We live in an age when most of us have lost faith in our institutions, the civil service, politicians and the private sector. That trust has been eroded over the past two decades by greed, politicians who no longer adhere to acceptable forms of behaviour, the shrill cacophony of social media seamlessly blending fact with fiction, and an emancipated Fourth Estate no longer able to defend the “little guy”. The adage “you can’t fight city hall” too often engenders a feeling of helplessness, particularly if the acquisition involves your family home, the sanctuary you hold inviolate; or your business, a livelihood born of blood, sweat and tears. Cheer up, not all is bad, the press and electronic media may no longer have the heft they once did, but you do have the protection of an excellent and independent judicial system. Why is that important? The letter you received from the acquiring authority may not have mentioned “expropriation”, and the words “judicial system” may raise the spectre of long and expensive litigation in which you, the little guy, are pitted against an acquiring authority with much deeper pockets. But bear with us. Even if your property has not yet been expropriated the negotiations will be framed by the Expropriation Act because the acquiring authority has to rely on it if they cannot reach a settlement with you by negotiation. Now, it has to be said, the Expropriation Acts do not represent the legal community’s finest hour. The Nova Scotia and New Brunswick Expropriation Acts, each appear to have been written in a hurry by somebody suffering from a hangover. The Newfoundland and Prince Edward Island Expropriation Acts have a distinct feudal flavour, drafted in the days when peasants lived in huts of mud and wattle, addressed their betters with a touch of forelock, eyes downcast and a mumbled “zur” (or that, at least, appears to have been the assumption of the persons drafting them). In fact the PEI Act doesn’t even attempt to lay out the framework for compensation, happily delegating it to the court system, undoubtedly in the pious hope that the judge would have a clue what it was all about, because the person drafting the legislation sure as hell didn’t! Only the Federal Expropriation Act can claim lucidity, and even it overlooks the fact that businesses occasionally occupy real estate and are adversely impacted if it is whipped away from under their feet. But, and this is the good news, none of this really matters very much because there are some good Expropriation Acts elsewhere and a body of case law and appraisal practice that have established well proven methodologies for identifying and calculating compensation. The courts have embraced the principle that, since expropriation is the exercise of police power by the state (or its surrogate), the benefit of the doubt lies with the unfortunate property owner and they have not been shy in ensuring that the latter does not suffer financial loss as a result.

 

Expropriation

 

So what is “Expropriation” and why should you care? Expropriation is the seizure of your property, or a part of it, by the government, or a body authorised by them, for public use or benefit. The bad news, as we have already mentioned, is that you cannot object to it unless you live in New Brunswick or the property is being acquired under the Federal Expropriation Act… the good news is that you are entitled to be fairly compensated for your loss. The initial approach from the acquiring authority advising you that they want to purchase part or all of your property will rarely mention the word “expropriation”. Whilst this may be an attempt to spare your feelings by appearing to be non-threatening you should be cautious. We no longer have a strong media but, as mentioned, we do have an excellent court system… and they are on your side. While you will probably never need to go to court you should avail yourself of the protection afforded by our judicial system. Your rights to fair and proper compensation are codified in the relevant Expropriation Act (sort of) but you will not be so protected unless (1) your property has been officially expropriated or (2) the acquiring authority has agreed in writing to proceed as though you had been expropriated i.e. that they will afford you all of the compensation you would have been entitled to under the Expropriation Act had your property been expropriated. So this is Step One, make sure that the acquiring authority is prepared to offer you all of the rights and privileges afforded by the Expropriation Act and get that commitment in writing. If they will not provide it, refuse to negotiate until they expropriate your property.

 

Compensation

 

It is a fundamental principle of Expropriation that the acquiring authority is required, as far as monetarily possible, to put you in the same position after the acquisition as you were before it. Most court decisions have interpreted that principle as giving you the benefit of the doubt, short of plundering the public purse. The federal and some provincial Expropriation Acts acknowledge that the negotiations are unevenly balanced in that the property owner faces an acquiring authority with much deeper pockets and resources. Some Expropriation Acts attempt to level that playing field by requiring that the acquiring authority be transparent in their calculations of compensation, and some give the property owner access to their own professional advice if they desire it, at the acquiring authority’s cost. The Federal Act unambiguously provides that the property owner is entitled to professional advice at the Fed’s cost, the Atlantic provinces are more parsimonious, sometimes offering it if the property owner wins in court (Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Newfoundland), or not considering it worthy of mention (Prince Edward Island). Nova Scotia limits the amount they will pay in legal costs and appraisal fees, something they are now allowed to do in their Act, so the unfortunate property owner has to pick up the rest of the cost, or find a cheap lawyer or appraiser. A word of caution: the devil is in the details and some acquiring authorities do not play by the rules established by the relevant Expropriation Act, case law or appraisal practice. It is essential to have an understanding of your rights under the Act, the type of compensation and how it is calculated. Each province in Atlantic Canada has its own Expropriation Act and each municipality, or other body with expropriation powers, is governed by that Act. The federal government also has its own Expropriation Act. Broadly speaking the Acts are similar, in practice if not content, and the methodology for calculating compensation is identical even when it is not specified in the legislation.

 

Negotiations

 

The acquiring authority may employ their own staff to negotiate, or will contract it out to a firm such as ourselves (we also negotiate on behalf of property owners). Our article “Land Agency… a respectable profession” elsewhere in this Blog details our approach when we are representing the acquiring authority: you should expect nothing less. The act of expropriation, or its anticipation, obligates the acquiring authority to fairly compensate you for your loss and that means they must engage in “principled negotiation” rather than attempt to settle the compensation claim for the lowest amount. If you find that you are not comfortable negotiating, insist that the acquiring authority pay for your professional representation. Whether the Act specifically allows for it or not, it has been our experience that acquiring authorities want to reach agreement without the adverse publicity of a formal expropriation, much less the agony and expense of a court action. They recognise that some property owners need professional assistance and that this may facilitate an agreement. If the acquiring authority is attempting to negotiate compensation before they formally expropriate, particularly if your property comprises woodland or agricultural land, the acquiring authority may attempt to negotiate without commissioning an appraisal, using instead their knowledge of property values. There is nothing wrong with them so doing provided they are open and transparent about their compensation calculations and are able to validate them by reference to other property sales. However you can require that the acquiring authority provide you with a formal appraisal (they have to anyway if they formally expropriate) and you should insist on this if your property has buildings on it, is in an urban area, or if only part of your property is being acquired and the remainder is likely to be adversely impacted. Many Expropriation Acts (Federal, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick) require that the formal offer after expropriation has to be accompanied by an appraisal. The formal appraisal should meet, at a minimum, the Canadian Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (CUSPAP) www.aicanada.ca/about-aic/cuspap/ . Frankly CUSPAP is not the most rigorous standard in the world, it is not specifically directed at expropriation, and most appraisers (like most lawyers) are not sufficiently familiar or skilled in recognising and computing the various Heads of Claim. Do not accept any appraisal tendered by the acquiring authority at face value. Research the author of the appraisal report on the internet and check his/her reputation with a trusted professional advisor to verify that they are experienced in expropriation work. At a minimum they should be an Accredited Appraiser of the Appraisal Institute of Canada or a Member of the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (Valuation) but neither qualification guarantees that they are experienced and knowledgeable in expropriation. Do not assume that the acquiring authority has already done the research and has chosen their appraiser on the basis of merit; the Federal Government and some provinces do so, but other provinces and many municipalities, Halifax Regional Municipality for example, simply select an accredited appraiser on the basis of cheapest cost. Some acquiring authorities will instruct the appraiser to limit the types of compensation (Heads of Claim) they consider in the appraisal and although the omissions may be listed in the appraisal report their significance can easily be overlooked. The Province of New Brunswick Department of Transportation and Infrastructure, for example, instruct their appraisers to ignore Injurious Affection and Special Economic Advantage, items which often constitute the bulk of the loss suffered by the property owner.

 

Heads of Claim – A Hitch Hiker’s Guide

 

A governing spirit of expropriation, or the negotiations which preclude it, should be that the property owner (and tenant if the property is rented) will not suffer financial loss as the result of losing all, or part, of their property. You will not be compensated for emotional loss arising, for example, from the upheaval in your life. If you are a property owner the types of loss and accompanying compensation will fall under some, or all, of the following Heads of Claim:

 

(1) Market Value of the interest acquired in the property.

(a) “Market Value” is defined differently in the various Expropriation Acts but essentially is the amount of money you would get for your interest in the property if it was sold on the open market. For example, if you occupy and own the freehold (fee simple) interest in a residence which is acquired in its entirety by the municipality, your compensation will equal the sale price you would have achieved had you sold the property of your own free will through a real estate agent. This can cause a problem if the Market Value of your property is lower than that of other properties in the neighbourhood since the cash you receive will not be adequate to purchase a similar home. In that instance you are entitled to additional compensation under the “Home for a Home” head of claim (see below). Unfortunately you will not be compensated for any “special” value your property may have to the acquiring authority over and above its Market Value.

(b) If the municipality only takes part of your property (typically part of your front yard in the case of a road widening), you are entitled to the Market Value of that portion of your property. Obviously calculating Market Value is somewhat problematic since bits of front yards are not typically sold on the open market. Its value will therefore be based on the sale prices of comparable vacant lots expressed on a square foot or other unit basis. You are also entitled to the value of any improvements such as lawns, flower beds, bushes, etc. … but not the emotional value you may have invested in nurturing them. If fences and steps have to be demolished the acquiring authority has to replace them. Sometimes the loss of a front yard is so extreme it renders the home unsuitable for continued owner occupation; it may be uninhabitable or suitable only as transient accommodation such as short term rental. In that event the owner should be able to substantiate the acquiring authority purchasing the entire property. The “Home for a Home” provision may then be relevant.

 

(2) Home for a Home

(a) If the property is occupied by the owner, as opposed to being rented, as a family home, you will be entitled to additional compensation if the Market Value of the property is inadequate to purchase a similar home in the neighbourhood. In this event your compensation will be based on the Market Value of similar homes for sale in the neighbourhood. What happens if there are none for sale? Whilst the compensation does not require that you remain in the neighbourhood it does get a little tricky if you do not have that choice. In the unhappy event that substitutes are not available you would be entitled to be compensated for the Market Value of the next best alternative.

(b) If the property is rented, a cottage, or anything other than an owner occupied family home, your compensation is restricted to Market Value even if you cannot purchase a similar property with it. The acquisition will also trigger tax liabilities which you did not contemplate until you intended to sell the property. It is our view that the impact of paying those taxes now, rather than deferring them for the future, is a valid compensable item.

 

(3) Disturbance

(a) When a property owner is forced to move out of their home there will be moving expenses, as well as items such as drapes for the new home. The acquiring authority is required to compensate the owner for these items. If it is not practical to estimate these costs some Expropriation Acts (Federal and Nova Scotia) provide an allowance instead of up to 15% of the Market Value. The New Brunswick Expropriation Act allows, in addition to moving expenses, 5% of the market value of the residential portion expropriated, to compensate for the cost and inconvenience of finding another residence. The other Acts do not place any value on the unfortunate property owner’s time.

(b) If the property contains a business the occupant will suffer a variety of losses. If the business has to relocate it will incur a number of costs: new stationery, informing customers, staff overtime packing and unpacking, new signage, etc. as well as the cost of the move itself. Whether the business moves or not, profits will usually be adversely impacted by the road widening scheme and/or the relocation. Trade once lost to competitors may takes years to recapture, may even be lost forever. Whilst all of the foregoing is compensable some Acts provide that compensation for loss of goodwill, where the business has relocated, can be deferred for the earlier of a year (Nova Scotia) or nine months (New Brunswick) after the relocation, or for three years (Nova Scotia) or two years (New Brunswick) after the expropriation. It is not clear when the business can expect to be paid if it does not relocate, but given that it has to prove its loss one imagines that this would be twelve months (Nova Scotia), or nine months (New Brunswick) after the road widening scheme is complete. Thus a business can struggle to survive during and after the road widening but cannot claim for its loss until later. Whilst the acquiring authority can agree with the business owner to waive the deferment it is our experience that such is not normally the practice. Business loss (goodwill) is not specifically mentioned in the Federal, Newfoundland or Prince Edward Island Acts but is a compensable item.

 

(4) Injurious Affection

(a) Where only a portion of the property is acquired, a common situation with road widening schemes, the balance of the land may be reduced in value because (1) the remaining property is less useful since it is smaller, a more awkward shape, or is severed from the main parcel and/or (2) the construction or use of the road on the land acquired adversely impacts the value of the remaining property. For example, it may no longer be possible to park a vehicle on the land remaining because it is now too small or of the wrong configuration. A residential property without parking is less valuable than a house with a driveway. The construction of the widened highway may render access to the property more difficult if traffic increases. The increased noise and loss of privacy in the home which results from it being closer to the highway will reduce its value. Or take a farm cut in two by a new highway. The farmland on the other side of the new road, particularly if it is limited access highway, will be considerably less valuable because it is no longer as accessible from the farm buildings. Farm fields impacted by the new highway may no longer be of optimum size and shape; drainage may be adversely affected too. In our experience Injurious Affection usually represents the vast majority of the loss sustained by the property owner, especially in residential properties impacted by road widening. The accepted method of calculating Injurious Affection is the “Before and After” method. This methodology is codified in the Federal and Nova Scotia Expropriation Acts. The property is valued as it existed prior to the acquisition and commencement of the road widening (Before Value); and then valued again on the assumption that the road scheme is complete (After Value). The difference between the Before and After values, minus the Market Value of the land acquired, is the Injurious Affection. The New Brunswick Expropriation Act provides that a claim for Injurious Affection has to be made within one year after the damage was sustained, otherwise it is barred.

(b) For housekeeping purposes some Expropriation Acts include Disturbance under Injurious Affection. This has no impact, other than to confuse matters, unless the acquiring authority has directed their appraiser to ignore Injurious Affection (a common practice with the New Brunswick Department of Transportation and Infrastructure).

 

(5) Special Economic Advantage

(a) If the property is owner occupied i.e. not rented, the owner may be able to claim for any special economic advantage arising out of, or incidental to, their occupation of the property to the extent that they have not been compensated under the other Heads of Claim. For example, if you or a member of your family is disabled, and the home has been adapted to meet their requirements with ramps, grab bars, wider doorways and hallways, stair lifts etc. you will be able to claim for the cost of these improvements.

(b) The same conditions apply with commercial property that has been adapted to suite the unique requirements of the business. It applies as well to property that has additional value because of its location, such as a woodlot proximate to the owner’s mill.

(c) Special Economic Advantage is specifically mentioned in the Federal, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick Act.

 

(6) Special Purpose Properties

(a) Some properties do not normally sell on the open market; churches, schools, hospitals, religious and charitable institutions are examples. If the property being acquired falls into this category and the owner has to relocate, they can base their compensation claim on the reasonable cost of creating a similar property (technically known as “the cost of equivalent reinstatement”). Even though the buildings on the property they are vacating may be old, the claim for compensation can be based on the cost of building a new, otherwise identical structure, plus the cost of acquiring a replacement site…. though some Acts (Federal, New Brunswick) attempt to claw back some of the compensation if the owner has improved their position.

(b) The Federal Act, cognisant no doubt that we are meant to be a secular society and less fearful for their immortal soul than the Provinces, do not restrict the qualifying properties to religious institutions and instead embrace all properties that do not normally sell on the open market.

 

(7) Professional Fees

(a) The Federal Act provides that the acquiring authority pay the legal, appraisal and other costs reasonably incurred in ascertaining a claim for compensation. The onus is on the property owner to ensure that the costs are reasonably incurred, not that they are reasonable.

(b) The Nova Scotia Act provides that the owner is entitled to be paid the reasonable costs necessarily incurred in ascertaining a claim for compensation but this is only triggered by an application to the Nova Scotia Utility and Review Board after negotiations have failed. However in practice they are compensable up to the date the acquiring authority makes their Offer to Settle (just before the start of the Board hearing) and are not conditional on the property owner winning their case. Reimbursement of costs incurred after the Offer to Settle are conditional on the outcome of the hearing. The province has recently placed a limit on the fees it will reimburse for legal and appraisal advice. The property owner will now have to fund the difference, or find a cheap lawyer and appraiser.

(c) The New Brunswick Act makes no provision for the reimbursement of professional fees unless the matter proceeds to Court. Reimbursement may be dependent on the compensation award.

(d) The Newfoundland Act provides that professional fees are only paid for proceedings before the Board and they are conditional on the outcome of the hearing.

(e) The Prince Edward Island Act has yet to acknowledge the necessity for professional advice or its role in protecting property owners.

 

(8) Betterment

(a) Where only part of the property is being acquired, the remaining property may increase in value as a result of the scheme for which the property was purchased. For example, land may be purchased for a highway intersection, with the result that the land remaining after the acquisition increases in value because it has development potential for a service station, hotel, shopping centre or other commercial use. This increase in value, known as “Betterment”, has to be offset against the compensation. Depending on the Expropriation Act, Betterment may be offset against the (1) total compensation [Newfoundland and Prince Edward Island] or (2) the land remaining after the expropriation [Federal, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick].

 

(9) Factors Not To Be Taken Into Account

(a) Anticipated use by the scheme for which the property was expropriated.

(b) A value established by reference to a transaction which occurred after publication of the intention to expropriate, or the actual expropriation if there was no published intention to expropriate.

(c) Any increase or decrease in value resulting from anticipation of the expropriation.

(d) Any increase in value resulting from the property being utilised for an illegal use.

 

(10) Heads of Claim Have To Be Consistent

(a) The Market Value of the land acquired has to be based on its existing use value if the costs of relocating are to be allowed. For example, a property owner cannot claim for removal costs if he/she is basing the value of their property on the assumption that it could be redeveloped.

 

(11)  Payment of Compensation

(a)  Federal, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Acts - A “without prejudice” offer has to be made by the acquiring authority within 90 days of registration of the Notice of Expropriation. If the parties do not agree the compensation the Federal Act provides for payment of 100% of the offer of compensation; the Nova Scotia Act for 75% of the compensation (excluding business disturbance) and the New Brunswick Act 100% of the “Market Value” (other Heads of Claim such as Injurious Affection are excluded). This payment is “without prejudice” and the property owner is free to pursue his/her claim for additional compensation.

(b) Newfoundland – the property owner has to file a claim for compensation within the time limit specified in the Notice of Expropriation and where the parties do not agree on the amount the matter is sent to the Board to be “fixed”. Compensation is paid out within six months of the Board’s decision.

(c) Prince Edward Island – the property owner has to file a claim for compensation within six months of registration of the Notice of Expropriation “or in the case of land injuriously affected within six months of the injury”. Payment is only made after the parties agree on the amount.


Mike Turner is Chairman of Turner Drake & Partners Ltd. A fifty year veteran of expropriation on two continents he is still shocked at the cavalier attitude some acquiring authorities adopt when dealing with property owners. If you'd like more information about our expropriation services, feel free to contact Mike at (902) 429-1811 Ext. 312 or mturner@turnerdrake.com


Wednesday, September 18, 2019 1:47:53 PM (Atlantic Daylight Time, UTC-03:00)  #    -
Atlantic Canada | Counselling | Expropriation | New Brunswick | Newfoundland & Labrador | Nova Scotia | Prince Edward Island
# Monday, July 8, 2019


“How much? Get out!” (followed by the noise of a slamming door). Another day in the life of the hapless land agent, doing his level best to get the most for the least. At least that’s the common perception, but here at Turner Drake we approach things a little differently.  Our team of Land Agents follow the concept of “principled negotiation”, not positional bargaining.  And it works.  We are routinely retained to provide Land Agency services under contract to governments and corporations, who are increasingly out-sourcing this type of work to the private sector.  The projects we work on are large and small, involving anywhere from half a dozen to several hundred different property owners, and our mandate is simple: negotiate fair deals for the purchase of land interests to support infrastructure projects. Without upsetting anyone.

Roads and transmission lines are especially popular these days.  Seems we just can’t live without them. These are corridor acquisitions: mile after mile of trees and fields with the occasional home or business. All neighbours.  All savvy negotiators. And all deeply suspicious of strangers who turn up on the doorstep bearing gifts.  So our approach must respect that and we have developed a simple formula built around three principles:

Consistency

We can’t divulge offers and settlements to neighbours.  It’s a privacy thing.  But we expect that neighbours will talk as soon as we leave.  In fact we encourage it.  They can compare figures if they like, essentially testing our integrity to see if anyone got a better or worse deal than the others. And therein lies the challenge with corridor acquisitions.  Those at the end of the line must be treated the same as those at the beginning; those who settle quickly must be treated the same as those who hold out for more; those who shout must be treated the same as those who whisper. Sure, there are perfectly valid reasons for paying different amounts, but it can’t be arbitrary.  It must be explainable.  It must be credible.  And it must be fair.

Transparency

We go to great lengths to make sure landowners understand what is happening and what is going to happen. Large infrastructure projects will already have gone through a very public process by the time we get involved and many landowners will have attended open houses …. and perhaps already made their views known. But the regulatory framework for compensation and landowner’s rights under the law are usually a mystery.  We explain them.  Fully.  Our team of Land Agents are trained negotiators with the support of an entire team of in-house professionals to draw on.  So we don’t present take-it-or-leave-it offers. We explain how they are calculated, usually by reference to a base-line appraisal or a third party site-specific appraisal. All of which is revealed to the landowners so they too can see how the calculations are made.

Respect

It goes without saying but we’ll say it anyway. Every landowner has a story to tell and it is our job to listen.  Respectfully and with an open mind. Of course we don’t believe everything we hear, but invariably we will learn something from everyone just sitting around their kitchen table. Eating the free cookies. Most people just want their voice to be heard, and anyone who is being asked to give up their land against their wishes deserves to be heard. We call it respect. It builds trust and it leads to mutually agreeable results.  And that’s all we’re looking to achieve. Without drama.  Without the slamming of doors.


Lee Weatherby is the Vice President of our Counselling Division. If you'd like more information about our counselling services, feel free to contact Lee at (902) 429-1811 or lweatherby@turnerdrake.com
Monday, July 8, 2019 3:45:55 PM (Atlantic Daylight Time, UTC-03:00)  #    -
Atlantic Canada | Counselling | New Brunswick | Newfoundland & Labrador | Nova Scotia | Prince Edward Island | Turner Drake
# Thursday, December 13, 2018


Specific Claims are launched by a First Nation band against the Government of Canada for historic grievances, typically over issues like unfulfilled treaty obligations, loss of reserve lands and mishandled First Nation funds. The most common cases that cross our desk involve the sale of reserve lands by the government of the day without the Band’s consent, either because it was never surrendered by them or because it was invalidly surrendered.

The events are always historic and quite often pre-date Confederation – a time when settlers were actively seeking to establish themselves in the new world and the government of the day was eagerly trying to accommodate them through grants and leases of land.  And sometimes that happened to be unsurrendered reserve land.

Those readers with a penchant for all things historical will find interesting reading on the origins of these claims by researching King George III’s “Proclamation of 1763”, issued in those turbulent times of squabbling between the French and the British. It imposed a fiduciary duty of care on the Crown which endures to this day, and is enshrined in the Constitution Act of 1982.  Heady stuff.

Our involvement in these files begins when the historical research has been done and the claim has been accepted by the government for negotiation. The stage is then set for negotiations to begin over the amount of compensation that the FN should receive from the Government of Canada.

The structure within which these negotiations take place is laid out in federal government guidelines. The first, released in 1982, set out the policy on specific claims and established guidelines for the assessment of claims and negotiations. These were tweaked under successive governments but the fundamentals remain the same.  They can currently be found in the document entitled “Specific Claims Policy and Process Guide”, available online and currently (still) under review.

We have been actively engaged on claim files in the Maritime provinces since the company began over 40 years ago – impressive, but a mere blink of the eye within the context of the time periods actually covered by these types of claims. Our involvement occurs in one of two ways.

1.       As an independent Consultant, hired under a joint terms of reference to calculate the ingredients of the claim, which then forms the platform for negotiations between the parties.

2.       As a Technical Expert on behalf of the First Nation, advising their negotiation and legal team on the technical aspects of the claim, ensuring that the process follows the guidelines and that the FN receives the compensation it is due.

We have represented (or continue to represent in currently active claims) over half a dozen First Nations throughout NS and NB, usually in the role of Technical Expert.

The structure of a claim is set out in the guideline and usually there are two components, calculated separately but intrinsically linked through the historical record.

(1) Current Unimproved Market Value - Where a claimant band can establish that certain of its reserve lands were never lawfully surrendered, or otherwise taken under legal authority, the band shall be compensated either by the return of the lands or by the current unimproved value of the lands. A relatively straight forward process…..

(2) Historical Loss of Use - Compensation will include an amount based on the loss of use of the lands in question, where it can be established that the claimants did in fact suffer such a loss. This can include losses from timber, agriculture, minerals and aggregates, fishing rights, land rental losses and a myriad of other components.  A far from simple process, often involving experts from different fields … and forests. The claim clock begins when the lands where first taken – usually 100 years or more in the past.

The process is not a quick one. Reconstructing historical events – and placing a value on them - takes time and diligence.  This is no splash-and-dash appraisal job.  And rightly so because there is much at stake here. Claims typically run into the millions of dollars and the calculations behind them must withstand robust scrutiny by both sides.  The cost of righting past wrongs does not come cheaply – or quickly.


Lee Weatherby is the Vice President of our Counselling Division. If you'd like more information about our counselling services, feel free to contact Lee at (902) 429-1811 or lweatherby@turnerdrake.com
Thursday, December 13, 2018 10:43:20 AM (Atlantic Standard Time, UTC-04:00)  #    -
Atlantic Canada | Counselling | New Brunswick | Newfoundland & Labrador | Nova Scotia | Prince Edward Island | Turner Drake
# Wednesday, August 24, 2016

Builders of multiple-unit residential apartment buildings will be all-too familiar with the GST/HST self-supply rules administered by Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) under the Excise Tax Act. Engaging with CRA at any level is a knee-trembling experience that is best avoided if at all possible, so spare a thought for apartment builders, who have no choice but to engage every time they finish a new project. The self-supply rules require that builders volunteer the value of their completed asset, remit the GST/HST due and then wait to be told if they got it right. Welcome to the unnerving world of self-supply.

Based on the number of calls we have been getting of late, CRA is growing increasingly suspicious of the values being declared by builders in this new age of ultra-low discount rates and ultra-high property values. They smell profit and want a bigger piece of it. If you’ve been targeted for scrutiny, it’s time to call for reinforcements.

How it works

For those who are unfamiliar with the process and want to follow along, this is how it works. Generally speaking, “used” residential property is exempt from GST/HST and no liability arises when it is sold in the marketplace. But new residential property is taxable upon completion, and for rental property the liability usually arises when the first unit is occupied, at which time GST/HST becomes payable based on the “Fair Market Value” of the asset. The most common situation, of course, is newly constructed rental apartment buildings, but the self-supply rules apply to other types of residential property, including condominiums if the builder chooses to rent them rather than sell them, an increasingly likely scenario in markets where the demand for condominiums has dried up. So on that happy day when the first unit is rented, the builder is deemed to have sold and repurchased the property at its declared (i.e. self-assessed) “Fair Market Value,” and gets to celebrate the occasion by remitting the required GST/HST.

The purpose of the GST/HST self-supply rules is to ensure the builder does not escape paying tax on value-added components of the project, such as the value of employed labour, financing costs and profit, the value of which would have been taxable had the asset been sold rather than rented upon completion. According to the official CRA publication (GST/HST Memoranda series 19.2.3, paragraph 5), the stated purpose of the self-supply rules is to create a “level playing field” and remove the potential tax advantage a builder would otherwise have in constructing a residential complex for rent.

So what is “Fair Market Value” and what does the Tax Court say?

CRA’s Policy P-165R gives some guidance and basically interprets it as the highest price that can be achieved in an unrestricted market – much the same as the industry-standard definition of Market Value. It also recognises the three traditional methods for determining Market Value, colloquially known as the “three approaches to value,” being the Cost, Income and Direct Comparison approaches. While the CRA Policy statement does say that no particular method should be excluded categorically, the Tax Court of Canada has tended to favour the Cost Approach in its rulings on GST/HST self-assessment cases. The most recent Tax Court ruling to cross our desk (Beaudet v. The Queen, 2014 TCC 52) adopted the Cost Approach method in favour of the other methods to establish the Fair Market Value of a residential apartment complex, but only after giving careful consideration to each of the other methods. So don’t be fooled into thinking the other valuation methods have no relevance: on the contrary, CRA will expect all the relevant valuation approaches to be examined and reconciled. They are deeply suspicious that reliance solely on the Cost Approach method conceals genuine profit, whereas the Income Approach method uncovers it. They might be right, but buildings which sell in the marketplace and generate those ultra-low discount rates are cash flow vehicles, delivering stable revenues backed up by full occupancy and a track record of success. New-builds have neither full occupancy nor a track record and must be valued accordingly for self-supply purposes.

Whether or not the final result matches other market valuations done on the same property for other purposes – typically mortgage financing – does not appear to distract the Court, which remains firmly focused on the specific issue at hand. That was perhaps most clearly expressed in an earlier Tax Court decision (Sira Enterprises v. The Queen 98-2463-GST-G) when it said “[t]he Court’s duty is to determine the fair market value of the properties for the purpose of the GST. The Court is not interested in the fair market value of these properties for the purpose of sale, and indeed there might be many factors which might have to be considered if the court were required to determine the fair market value for the purpose of sale, which may not be relevant for GST purposes.”

So protect yourself and sleep well

Our advice to builders is to be pre-emptive: have an independent assessment of the Fair Market Value done upon – or even in advance of – completion to support the self-assessed value being reported for GST/HST purposes. That puts you in the best possible position to defend a future challenge, and will undoubtedly help you sleep at night.

So if you, or someone close to you, is losing sleep at the prospect of engaging with CRA, give our Counselling Division a call.



Written by Lee Weatherby, Vice President of our Counselling Division. For more information about our counselling services, feel free to contact Lee at (902) 429-1811 or lweatherby@turnerdrake.com

Wednesday, August 24, 2016 2:55:06 PM (Atlantic Daylight Time, UTC-03:00)  #    -
Counselling
# Monday, August 15, 2016

Linear projects such as transmission line rights of way (RoW) are fertile ground for seeds of suspicion, mistrust and hostility. The scale of the project which may involve dozens, if not hundreds of property owners ensures that the acquiring authority is required to deal with a similar number of individuals. The very nature of the scheme, the forcible taking of property from people who individually stand to gain little from its outcome, often fans the flame of opposition… an experience that pits the “little guy” against corporate Canada. This is worsened if the acquiring authority deploys agents who rely on bluff, bluster and bonhomie rather than real estate expertise, and consider it their mandate to minimize the compensation payable.

Few acquiring authorities assess compensation on a property-specific basis before opening negotiations, or follow the leadership of the Nova Scotia Department of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal and agree to the owner retaining professional advice at the acquiring authority’s expense. Most regard the property owner as a hindrance. They wait until negotiations founder before preparing an accurate estimate of the compensation properly payable under the Expropriation Act presumably on the assumption that, since they have not expropriated the property, anything goes. Even when a formal estimate of loss is prepared by an independent appraiser, it may not address the entire compensation… little wonder then that property owners distrust authority.

As part of our Counselling Division, which has completed the valuation and negotiation of compensation for several large infrastructure projects, I have seen tension between the acquiring authority and landowners unfold. Based on those experiences, here are the Top 5 reasons property owners use to warn the acquiring authority to “Stay off my land!”

5. The Grudge

One of the most difficult obstacles to overcome is a landowner who simply does not trust the acquiring authority. Often this is because they have been forced to part with their land in the past to make way for an already established RoW, and their previous experience was not a good one. Landowners that are approached yet again may view the current acquisition as a way to “settle the score” for an acquisition they feel was handled poorly in the past. A landowner that has a longstanding negative view of the acquiring authority may be difficult to deal with from Day 1.

4. Uninvited Guests

Much like the stress caused by termites, cockroaches or your in-laws, many landowners worry about the uninvited guests that a new RoW across their land may bring: hunters, recreational vehicles or people looking for a quiet place to dump their garbage. These concerns generally involve worries about damage to the land, liability issues and environmental impact.

3. Au Naturel

Appearances can be deceiving, and sometimes scrub land that appears to have little value may offer far more than meets the eye. Land can harbour an abundance of natural resources from which its owners can profit, such as cultivated crops, gravel deposits, minerals and harvestable timber. Often overlooked is the cost to extract these valuable resources and the fact that market values in many areas already incorporate resource values. Remember to be conscious of over-counting and double-counting when it comes to compensation payments.

2. Nothing Will Ever Be the Same

The general impact of the new RoW is something that almost every landowner contemplates. Some consider the impact to be minimal and will be happy to support the project in exchange for fair compensation payment, but others view the impact as harmful and often have many legitimate concerns that should be addressed. Common concerns include changes to view planes, interference with access, increased noise levels, loss of windbreaks, parcel severance and health concerns.

1. The Greatest Subdivision that Never Was

If I had a nickel for every time I was told that a new RoW was impacting a future subdivision … well, I’d have at least a couple bucks! Impact on future development potential is hands down the most common theme that I have encountered. Sometimes legitimate subdivisions or lands ripe for development are disrupted by RoW projects, and in those instances landowners should be compensated accordingly. However, in my experience many of the “subdivisions” that RoWs just can’t seem to avoid are more of a dream than a reality.

Overall, I would say that the concerns expressed by landowners are often a blend of rational and irrational thought. The world is becoming a more sophisticated place, and landowners are better educated and have access to more information than ever before. In the past, liaison with landowners may have simply included a couple of phone calls and a pat on the back from an employee of the acquiring authority. Nowadays the representative of the acquiring authority should have an increasing number of abilities including exceptional interpersonal skills, above-average organizational skills, patience and training in real estate valuation techniques.

The representative of the acquiring authority should give all landowners the benefit of the doubt and listen carefully to all of their concerns without judgement. Listening to the concerns of a landowner and working with them to mitigate as many of these items as possible is a great way to gain a landowner’s trust. However it is important to be aware that some landowners will go to extreme lengths in order to disrupt the project or increase the compensation payable to them. Good record keeping and a genuine understanding of the burdens that a RoW may bring to a landowner are key.

In the end, you’ll rarely win over every landowner involved in a RoW acquisition, but by keeping these five points in mind, hopefully you can minimize the number of times you hear the phrase “STAY OFF MY LAND!”



Written by Matthew Smith, Manager of our Counselling Division. For more information about our counselling services, feel free to contact him at (902) 429-1811 or MSmith@TurnerDrake.com.

Monday, August 15, 2016 12:43:03 PM (Atlantic Daylight Time, UTC-03:00)  #    -
Counselling
# Tuesday, March 29, 2016

The combined service of Turner Drake’s three most senior consultants is a staggering 110 years… and counting. Still swift of mind (if not of foot), they provide an unparalleled resource for our clients and give wise counsel to our own junior ranks. One of these senior consultants is Lee Weatherby, Vice President of our Counselling Division who is now well into his fourth decade of service with Turner Drake.

When Lee started with the company in 1981, we were operating nicely with cutting-edge typewriters, rotary-dial phones, and comfortable indoor plumbing. Already a veteran of the litigious world of expropriation, Lee was immediately able to share his training and experience with the local legal community. Over the years, he has worked alongside many lawyers, providing litigation support and forensic valuation advice. He has presented himself as an expert witness at countless trials, arbitrations, and mediation hearings, and while refusing to accept all the credit, it is worth noting that many of those who were once clients are now judges. And he was always nice to them.

Forensic valuation work is an invaluable tool when disputes arise. If you own real estate, you will have likely engaged with an irate tenant, landlord, insurance adjuster, assessor, or neighbour at one time or another. Any self-respecting lawyer will tell you that when serious disputes arise, negotiation is a far better solution than trial, and alternative dispute mechanisms are a happy middle ground for would-be combatants. Our own experience tells us that there are fewer litigants prepared to try their luck at trial, and for good reason. Inevitably, there will be some merit in both sides; when it comes to matters of real estate the challenge is to measure who has the best case and the best evidence to support it. The seasoned valuation expert will not only provide the underpinnings for your own case, but will also help to remove them from your opponent’s – presuming, of course, that your case is credible to start with. Exposing the frailties (and indeed the strengths) in your opponent will put you at a distinct advantage at the negotiating table, and greatly improve your chances of success should you decide to chance your luck at trial.

Thinking outside-the-box has long been a corporate philosophy within the halls of Turner Drake, and strategic thinking of one of the hallmarks of the Counselling Division. Challenging cases and unusual real estate assets are commonplace, and there aren’t many properties that Lee hasn’t encountered during his tenure with the company. He is never one to tire of the mundane, but tends to thrive on the more obscure challenges; from heavy water production plants to underwater burial grounds, from debunked bunkers of the cold war era to obsolete pulp and paper mills of the modern era. There is little that has not crossed his desk at one time or another and no challenge has ever been left unresolved. If you have a property that’s a real head scratcher, give Lee a call.




Lee Weatherby, Vice President of our Counselling Division. For more information about our counselling services, feel free to contact Lee at (902) 429-1811 or LWeatherby@TurnerDrake.com.
Tuesday, March 29, 2016 3:49:24 PM (Atlantic Standard Time, UTC-04:00)  #    -
Counselling
# Thursday, December 11, 2014

Court work is one of the responsibilities - and hazards - of our profession. Valuation reports are often prepared to help settle disputes and assist with negotiations, but inevitably some cases will proceed to a court or arbitration hearing.  In my field of work, expropriations are the most common files to end up in the court room, where I will be obliged to attend and present evidence as an expert witness.  I can expect to be examined and questioned by lawyers for both sides, intent on casting me either as hero or villain depending on their client’s respective interests.  This is the ultimate test of professional accountability, and there is no doubt the role of expert witness can be an uncomfortable one even for the initiated.  The true objective is to survive with credibility still intact, but after 30 (plus) years in the business I have found there can be rewards.

Prepare, prepare, prepare

There will be no rewards if you are not properly prepared before entering the court room. It is not unusual for a case to be heard months, even years, after the work was done, by which time much of the detail will have been forgotten.  It is vital to take the time to review each page and every document in advance.  Fumbling through files in the witness box is unsettling - particularly if the client is watching.  It is akin to revising for exams; you know the information is in there, if only you could find it.  If the mantra of the real estate profession is location, location, location, then the slogan of the expert witness is prepare, prepare, prepare.  You’ll be glad you did.  This can be your finest hour… or your worst nightmare.

Taking charge of the witness box

Thorough preparation builds confidence and makes the presentation of your own evidence go much more smoothly, but most importantly it prepares you for the onslaught of cross examination. You rarely get an easy ride on cross examination.  The questions are intended to expose every flaw, magnify every error and batter the witness into submission.  But you are entitled to defend yourself; the witness box is your stage and you are entitled to perform when called upon.  

My colleague recalls an occasion before a particularly hostile and theatrical lawyer.  The cross examination began with a blistering attack, unleashed with menace and purpose, intended to reduce the witness to a quivering wreck right from the start.  He demanded an answer and was clearly prepared to wait all day till he got it.  The court room fell silent.  Not easily intimidated, the witness paused then calmly asked the court for a glass of water, drank it, and asked “Now, would you mind repeating the question, please”.  By which time the lawyer had forgotten the question and fumbled through papers trying to reconstruct the moment.  But it was lost. You could almost hear the applause.

The weight of the evidence

Don’t underestimate the power of paper.  “The one with the thickest file always wins” – or so they say, and I believe there is some truth to that when it comes to expert witnesses.  These days of course it’s the one with the most megabytes, but you can’t beat a thick file to demonstrate that the work was done thoroughly and diligently, full of supporting notes, data and analysis to defeat every question that might be asked.  Much of it might never be referred to but some of it will be entered into evidence and scrutinised.  I recently reached new heights at the weigh-in, hauling several boxes of material into the court room which were wheeled into place and unloaded in front of an expectant audience.  So effective was the reaction that I intend to repeat the performance on every occasion, filling boxes with dusty files from the basement if necessary.  “Question me at your peril; I have all the answers” is the message.

Testifying tips brought to you by our experienced expert witness and Vice President of our Counselling Division, Lee Weatherby. To learn more about Lee, visit our Team Leaders page or check out our Facebook page to get a little more intimate!

Thursday, December 11, 2014 12:54:47 PM (Atlantic Standard Time, UTC-04:00)  #    -
Counselling
# Thursday, July 24, 2014

1. Steel-Toe Boots/Shoes: Many industrial sites require steel-toe boots or shoes, however; they are handy to have at any inspection site, just in case you don’t see that raised curb or camouflaged sprinkler head. Better to be safe than sorry!

2. Camera: A picture is worth a thousand words… and will save you a lot of writing!  A good quality camera can help you relive that inspection experience firsthand once you’re back at the office.

3. Flashlight: The last place you want to be is under the street, in a dust covered 200 year old room that you just saw on Ghost Hunters last weekend... only to find out that the lights don’t work. Tip: If you’re often in the dark, invest in a headlamp… stylish and practical!

4. Batteries: Useful to power electronic measuring devices and the above referenced camera and flashlight. These tools aren’t much help without the juice!

5.      Extra Writing Utensils: Once I jogged across the street to quickly snap a picture of an apartment building but when I got back to the building I could not find my pencil for the life of me. So I stepped outside and looked around… only to find my pencil crushed to bits in the middle of the road.  Not to worry though, my back-up pencil and I completed the job just fine!

I recommend placing all of your inspection gear in a plastic tote that can easily be moved between the office and the trunk of your car.  By keeping everything in one place you will never forget to pack that one item you so desperately end up needing. 

Happy Inspecting!

Advice given by Matthew Smith, Consultant in Turner Drake’s Counselling division and Manager of our St. John’s office. For more real estate counselling advice, you can reach him at msmith@turnerdrake.com or 1 (800) 567-3033.

Thursday, July 24, 2014 3:41:07 PM (Atlantic Daylight Time, UTC-03:00)  #    -
Counselling